louisville gay catholic march

Roman Catholics March in Support of LGBTQ Inclusion

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Besides the obvious fact that the Roman Catholic institution is not a Christian institution to begin with, historically, at least in a public front, it has at least upheld basic principles of morality such as the heinousness of abortion and the detrimental effects of sexual immorality in society.

Recently, the Roman Catholic Church has been underfire for its enormous, worldwide homosexuality scandal. One journalist has even documented and estimated that at least 80 percent of Vatican priests are homosexual. This comes as no surprise, as Catholic policy forbids its clergy to marry — which makes the priesthood a magnet for the sexually deviant. They can hide their homosexual and paedophile lives under the guise of “celibacy” which, in turn would leave them unaccountable to their congregations for failing to be what the Scriptures require clergy to be — the husband of one wife (1 Timothy 3:2).

Why then, should it surprise anyone that Roman Catholics now take to the streets to protest the institutions official doctrines that exclude homosexuals from full communion in the Church? Isn’t it hypocritical to expect Catholics to stand against something the vast majority of the priesthood is participating in?

This weekend, dozens of Catholics took to the streets in Louisville, KY, to march in opposition to LGBT exclusion. WDRB reports that “the group was led by the Fairness Campaign and marched from The Volunteers of America to the Cathedral of the Assumption.”

Last year, Holy Spirit School counselor Allison King said she was forced to submit a letter of resignation to her employer because she is married to a woman.


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Louisville does have a fairness ordinance, but King says more needs to be done.

“What’s the benefit of exclusion? How does not including people help the church? I guess I can’t get my head around that,” King said.

WDRB reached out to the Archdiocese of Louisville for a statement on the pilgrimage. They say they cannot discuss past or present employees.

If you were to die today, where would you go? Heaven? Hell? Not sure?